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How to grow Hyacinthoides

How to grow Hyacinthoides:

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Hyacinthoides belongs to the Liliaceae family.

Not that long ago these bulbs were known as Scilla. The name has changed but they still brighten up your bushes and summer flowering perennials by planting these lovely bulbs in between. And the big benefit is their ability to multiply every year !

Fertilizing Hyacinthoides

How-tos : Fertilization for Annuals and Perennials

Annuals and perennials may be fertilized using: 1.water-soluble, quick release fertilizers; 2. temperature controlled slow-release fertilizers; or 3. organic fertilizers such as fish emulsion. Water soluble fertilizers are generally used every two weeks during the growing season or per label instructions. Controlled, slow-release fertilizers are worked into the soil ususally only once during the growing season or per label directions. For organic fertilizers such as fish emulsion, follow label directions as they may vary per product.

Light Conditions : Dappled Light

Dappled Light refers to a dappled pattern of light created on the ground, as cast by light passing through high tree branches. This is the middle ground, not considered shady, but not sunny either. Dappled remains constant throughout the day.

Watering Conditions : Regular Moisture for Outdoor Plants

Water when normal rainfall does not provide the preferred 1 inch of moisture most plants prefer. Average water is needed during the growing season, but take care not to overwater. The first two years after a plant is installed, regular watering is important. The first year is critical. It is better to water once a week and water deeply, than to water frequently for a few minutes.

Conditions : Moist and Well Drained

Moist and well drained means exactly what it sounds like. Soil is moist without being soggy because the texture of the soil allows excess moisture to drain away. Most plants like about 1 inch of water per week. Amending your soil with compost will help improve texture and water holding or draining capacity. A 3 inch layer of mulch will help to maintain soil moisture and studies have shown that mulched plants grow faster than non-mulched plants.

Conditions : Outdoor Watering

Plants are almost completely made up of water so it is important to supply them with adequate water to maintain good plant health. Not enough water and roots will wither and the plant will wilt and die. Too much water applied too frequently deprives roots of oxygen leading to plant diseases such as root and stem rots. The type of plant, plant age, light level, soil type and container size all will impact when a plant needs to be watered. Follow these tips to ensure successful watering:

* The key to watering is water deeply and less frequently. When watering, water well, i.e. provide enough water to thoroughly saturate the root ball. With in-ground plants, this means thoroughly soaking the soil until water has penetrated to a depth of 6 to 7 inches (1' being better). With container grown plants, apply enough water to allow water to flow through the drainage holes.

* Try to water plants early in the day or later in the afternoon to conserve water and cut down on plant stress. Do water early enough so that water has had a chance to dry from plant leaves prior to night fall. This is paramount if you have had fungus problems.

* Don't wait to water until plants wilt. Although some plants will recover from this, all plants will die if they wilt too much (when they reach the permanent wilting point).

* Consider water conservation methods such as drip irrigation, mulching, and xeriscaping. Drip systems which slowly drip moisture directly on the root system can be purchased at your local home and garden center. Mulches can significantly cool the root zone and conserve moisture.

* Consider adding water-saving gels to the root zone which will hold a reserve of water for the plant. These can make a world of difference especially under stressful conditions. Be certain to follow label directions for their use.


Conditions : Normal Watering for Outdoor Plants

Normal watering means that soil should be kept evenly moist and watered regularly, as conditions require. Most plants like 1 inch of water a week during the growing season, but take care not to over water. The first two years after a plant is installed, regular watering is important for establishment. The first year is critical. It is better to water once a week and water deeply, than to water frequently for a few minutes.

Planting How-tos : Planting Bulbs

Plant bulbs at a depth that is three times their height, and at least 1-1/2 bulb-widths apart. Work a little bone meal fertilizer into the bottom of your hole, and then place the bulb upright in the hole. The more pointed end is almost always the top. If you have trouble telling which is the top, look for evidence of where a stem or roots were last year. If in doubt, plant them sideways. Fill in with soil gently, making sure there are no rocks or clods that would impede the bulb's stem. When planting a great number of bulbs, dig out an area to the specified depth, place bulbs and replace soil. This ensures that ground has been properly prepared and bulbs are evenly spaced.

Plant bulbs in natural drifts rather that formal rows: bulbs can fail or be eaten, leaving holes in a formal arrangement, or will shift with freezing and thawing. If you have trouble with gophers or squirrels eating your bulbs, try sprinkling red pepper in the holes, covering the bulbs with chicken-wire, surround bulbs with sharp shards of gravel or other substance, or planting rodent-repelling bulbs like Fritillaria nearby.

 

Hyacinthoides Hispanica:

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Family: Liliaceae

Popular name: Spanish Bluebell Syn.: Endymion hispanicus, Scilla campanulata

Flower colour: white, pink or blue

Flowering period: May

Average plant height: 30-40 cm

Planting depth to base of bulb: 10 cm

Spacing between bulbs: 10 cm

Light requirements: full sun to partial shade

Landscape uses: borders, rock gardens and perennial beds

This is one of the tallest-growing scilla and also the one that is last to flower (one rare species blooms in the fall). Hanging from the sturdy, round flower stalks are lots and lots of broad, bell-shaped flowers.

The colour of this species found in the wild is violet-blue, but there are also large-flowering pink, white, light blue and dark blue cultivars available. Usually, these bare bulbs are sold as a mix of colours. Plant the bulbs in locations where the soil is rich in nutrients and sufficiently moist, and do so as soon as possible after acquiring them.

 

Hyacinthoides Non-Scripta:

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Family: Liliaceae

Popular name: English Bluebell Syn.: Scilla nutans, Endymion non-scriptus

Flower colour: blue, pink or white

Flowering period: May

Average plant height: 20-30 cm

Planting depth to base of bulb: 8 cm

Spacing between bulbs: 8 cm

Light requirements: partial shade

Landscape uses: under trees and shrubs, and in frequently mowed lawns.

These scilla look somewhat like the previous species but do not grow as tall and blooms a bit earlier. The flower stalks often lean a little toward one side because the flowers bloom all on one side.

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